What Do You Know about Lung Cancer?

hc-quiz-banner-lungcancer

What Do You Know about Lung Cancer?

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Question 1
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States.
A
True
B
False
Question 1 Explanation: 
True: According to the American Cancer Society, lung cancer accounts for about 27% of all cancer deaths and is by far the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women. In fact, each year, more people die from lung cancer than from colon, breast and prostate cancers combined.
Question 2
Quitting smoking eliminates one’s chances for getting lung cancer.
A
True
B
False
Question 2 Explanation: 
False: Quitting smoking doesn’t completely eliminate your risk of getting lung cancer, but it makes a difference. In fact, 10 years after quitting your risk of dying from lung cancer is half that of a person who is still smoking, explains the American Cancer Society. You’ll also gain other health benefits including:
  • 20 minutes after quitting: Your heart rate and blood pressure drop.
  • 12 hours after quitting: The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.
  • 2 weeks – 3 months after quitting: Your circulation improves and your lung function increases.
  • 1 – 9 months after quitting: Coughing and shortness of breath decrease.
  • 1 year after quitting: Your excess risk for coronary heart disease is half that of a continuing smoker’s.
If you’re ready to quit smoking, learn how ProMedica can help. Learn More
Question 3
Lung cancer, once diagnosed, is a highly curable disease.
A
True
B
False
Question 3 Explanation: 
False: Like most cancers, when lung cancer is detected early, patients often have a good chance of being cured. Unfortunately, about 90% of the people who have lung cancer die from the disease, in part because it’s often not found until the cancer is in an advanced stage, explains the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.
Question 4
Smoking is the only risk factor for lung cancer.
A
True
B
False
Question 4 Explanation: 
False: Smoking by far is the leading risk factor for lung cancer. At least 80% of lung cancer deaths are thought to result from smoking, says the American Cancer Society. But, there are other risk factors including exposure to secondhand smoke, radon, asbestos and other cancer-causing agents; personal or family history of lung cancer; and radiation therapy to the chest as part of past cancer treatment.
Question 5
New studies show low-dose CT scans can be used to screen for lung cancer and may increase the likelihood of surviving lung cancer.
A
True
B
False
Question 5 Explanation: 
True: Until recently, we didn’t have an effective screening tool for lung cancer. But, a recent study called the National Lung Screening Trial revealed that screening high-risk patients with low-dose CT (CAT) scans reduces mortality from lung cancer. High-risk patients include those:
  • Between 55 – 74 years old who smoke or have quit within the past 15 years and smoked at least a pack of cigarettes a day for 30 years or more.
  • Between 50 – 74 years old who smoked at least one pack of cigarettes a day for 20 years or more and have another lung cancer risk factor – not including secondhand smoke exposure.
To learn more about lung cancer screening at ProMedica, visit promedica.org/lungcancerscreening.
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